PLAY FORMAT

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Competition Scoring format

  • In any event where a card is handed in, it is only the GROSS score that is being verified.
    If the event is Stableford you are encouraged to calculate the Stableford points, but mistakes in this regard can be rectified at any time with no penalties incurred.The format of the rounds played in the competitions are arranged to provide the membership with a varied format for their golf. Generally the golf played by the society at each event conforms to one of the following formats :-
  • Stableford.

    The majority of the golf played by the society conforms to this format as it is not so punishing and should be quicker than medal play. For those who are not familiar with this type of play it will be useful to explain how the scoring works.

    First of all, we should stress that the gross score for each hole must be recorded. It is this that the player signs for. In the event of a hole not being completed, a No-Return (NR) may be entered.

    This is a stroke play competition, so no putts may be conceded as in match play.
    From the gross scores recorded, the handicap allowance is applied in accordance with the stroke index of each hole and a net score per hole calculated. From this:-

    – A net bogey scores 1 point
    – A net par scores 2 points
    – A net birdie scores 3 points
    – A net eagle scores 4 points

    Anything more than a net bogey scores ZERO points and you should pick up your ball at this point. The player scoring the most points over the course of the competition (usually 18 holes, sometimes 36 holes) is the winner.

  • Medal

    Every stroke taken during the round is counted and every hole must be completed. Your handicap is subtracted from your total number of strokes (Gross score) to give your net score. The lowest net score wins the competition.

  • Bogey

    A bogey is similar in many ways to the stableford. A player can obtain one plus point by beating net par on a hole. Net par results in a zero score whilst anything over par results in a negative one score. The player with the highest total score wins the competition.

    Gross scores are entered under player A on the card and the right hand column has either ‘+’, ‘-‘ or 0 entered. At the end of the round, count up the differences between ‘+’ and ‘-‘ holes for a total score for the round (typically ‘Plus 3’, ‘Minus 4’ or Level).

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